How Online Petitions Are Changing the World (and Hastings).

Published on by Rebecca Wheeler (author)

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Over 500 people have signed an online petition in order to protest against plans to close public toilets in Hastings and Ore.

 

The petition was created by a local woman who states on the form that the closure of the toilets would be an inconvenience to the elderly, those with children and people with particular medical needs.

 

The digital age has seen online petitions being used a platform to try and make big changes. With mediums such as Facebook and Twitter being used to share petitions, it’s becoming more and more easier for people across the world to have their say and try and make a change by typing their name into a box.

 

Popular website Change.org is home the some of the world’s most well-known petitions, many of which have become successful and have even gone to parliament. One success story was the bid to end Tampon Tax in the UK. After the online petition received signatures from over 320,000 supporters, the Treasure vowed to axe the tax on tampons and other feminine hygiene projects. It is expected that the amendment will be implemented by April 2018.

 

Other popular online petitions include a bid to fund 12 years of education for girls around the world which was created by Malala Yousafzai, this was supported by over one million people. And a request to impeach US President elect Donald Trump. Although the latter has failed to be successful, it has still received well over 80,000 online signatures.

 

While numbers online suggest that many people take part in online petitions, how many locals have put their name to virtual paper, and for what cause?  

 

 

In order for a petition to be considered for a debate in parliament, it must receive 100,000 signatures. While hundreds of people have already protested against Hastings Borough Council’s plans, there is still no clear answer what will happen to local public toilets.

 

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